Mexico, North America

simple summer salsa

This recipe is not some new discovery. I’ve been making this since high school when I ordered my “Kitchen Quick” off of t.v. Saying “off of t.v.” feels really weird. But it wasn’t online. I had my mom call to order this kitchen quick for me and it came with a recipe for salsa. This Kitchen Quick really catapulted my cooking love.  It was basically a hand-powered food processor. My friends would tease me that I would never come and hang out on the weekends anymore because I wanted to stay home and make “sals” (right, Min). The salsa recipe called for fresh cilantro, but this was ’98 in Iowa and we only had dried. By about 2000, you could easily find fresh cilantro in the stores.  The first time I used the fresh I about croaked. Disgusting! Now I love it. I can’t get enough.

I realize that this is the most basic salsa, but I think that’s what makes it so good! This is so easy, and there are so many GOOD tomatoes out there right now. So take advantage! You only really need a chef’s knife and a cutting board, but if you like a more blended salsa, use a food processor (I’ve had this one for 11 years) or blender.

  • 4 large tomatoes
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1 jalapenõ
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 lime
  • sea salt
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro
  1. chop the onion
  2. rinse the onion (rick bayless trick)
  3. chop all the veggies OR cut the veggies into large pieces and then put into the food processor or blender- including cilantro so skip step 5
  4. juice the lime and add it to the veggies
  5. chop and add the cilantro
  6. season with salt.

*besides fresh cilantro, I think that having a fresh salsa with enough lime and salt is key. It’s so important that it can make up for the fact that you have bad tomatoes.  Speaking of which, make this salsa even if you DON’T have tomatoes. Still good!

*I searched and searched for the Kitchen Quick infomercial youtube but I couldn’t find it.   I did find this creepy one though.

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Europe

goat cheese, prosciutto, and fig bites


These little bites are a classic and decadent combo, perfect with snacking on with a friend over a bottle of wine. Fresh figs are in season now. I use the green ones because they’re just gorgeous in color, both inside and out.  I used Trader Joe’s French baguette as the canvas then I layered the cheese, prosciutto, a honey balsamic glaze, fresh basil and topped with a beautiful fig slice.

Enzo is such a nosy dog.

ingredients:

1 baguette, sliced, toasted or not

1 package of prosciutto

1 cup washed and sliced fresh figs (dried will be just great when fresh is out of season)

1 package fresh basil, washed and dried

1 4 oz. package goat cheese, softened

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar glaze

1 tablespoon honey

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

salt and pepper

method:

Mix together the balsamic vinegar glaze, honey, and olive oil. If you don’t have, or can’t find the glaze, use a regular balsamic vinegar and use a little less and add a little more honey. Season this mixture with salt and pepper.

Assemble the bites. Take a piece of baguette and spread it with goat cheese. Since my baguette slices were very small, I used just a 1/4 slice of prosciutto. Do this to all slices of bread and then take the balsamic honey mixture and drizzle over the top. Now lay one basil leaf on each piece then a slice of fig. Season all slices with some course cracked pepper.  Enjoy outside with a friend and a glass of Rosé

Aren’t those fig’s gorgeous?
Iowa, North America

easter feast part one: deviled eggs

2 egg

Deviled eggs happen to be another early high school cooking class recipe.  Our teacher taught us how to make deviled eggs using a plastic sandwich bag to mash all the ingredients together in.  Then, you snip off the corner and squeeze it into the egg white.  I remember going home that day and making them after school.  Thinking back, I find it really funny that I would make myself deviled eggs for an after school snack.

Deviled eggs are a fun, retro type snack that everybody loves. You always see people getting real excited when you bring them to a party. Everyone has to really hold themselves back from not taking too many.  I found quickly that the secret to good deviled eggs is having enough salt and vinegar. You need that yolk mixture to be just a little too strong to eat on its own so that the egg white shell balances it.  I’ve eaten quite a few amazing deviled egg combinations: green goddess (avocado with tarragon), deviled eggs with bacon and sriracha, and deviled eggs with smoked salmon and capers.  All these combinations are amazing and I love trying really unique deviled egg recipes.  This recipe, however, is very basic, but also my favorite. If I had to pick one recipe to stick with my whole life long, this would be it!

classic deviled eggs

serves 6

ingredients:

6 eggs

1/2 cup mayo

4 teaspoons yellow mustard (I prefer 2 tsp. Colman’s and 2 tsp. regular yellow mustard)

1 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 tablespoon white vinegar

½ teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pepper

Fresh chives and or paprika for garnish

 

mustard
I used 2 teaspoons of Coman’s mustard and 2 teaspoons regular yellow mustard. The Colman’s has a sharper, slightly spicy flavor to it. Quite strong.

 

Method:

Boil the eggs for 10 minutes and then put them into an ice water bath immediately.  I’ve heard the secret to easy peeling eggs is that they are cold when you peel them.  You can find all sort of tips on the internet about this but what I’ve found is that none of them work.  It’s all luck.  Either that or I’m horrible about peeling eggs.  I usually make my husband do it and laugh when he gets really mad with how poorly he can peel them.  

Once the eggs are peeled (you’re now either really satisfied because it went well, or pissed off about how ugly your whites look), slice them in half the long way and gently scoop out the yolks into a medium sized bowl.  Add the mayo, mustard, vinegar, salt, and pepper. Mix with a fork or potato masher until desired smoothness. Carefully spoon the yolk mixture into the egg whites. Sprinkle with freshly chopped chives and or a little paprika.  Be sure to remind people to savor them because peeling them was such a pain.  People sometimes need a little guilt with their deviled eggs 🙂

1 egg

*This is the first post in my Easter feast series.  I’ll soon be adding recipes for my grandmother’s ham balls, a spring snap pea and snow pea salad with shallots, walnuts, and dates, and also a recipe for truffled twice-cooked new potatoes. If you’re wanting to try the ham balls and you don’t live in the midwest, call your butcher now to have them ground together 2 pounds of ham and 2 pounds of ground pork. They won’t be happy about it because they will have to clean out their grinder and then clean it again.  I’ve been told it’s a real pain. 

By the way, do you have any tips for me on how to easily peel eggs? Tell me what works for you. Please! And Mom, I know you’re reading this.  Is this pretty close to how you make deviled eggs?